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Is a college degree really worth the long-term debt?

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Opinions are split, but not evenly.

In spite of soaring student debt, often heralded as a crisis by the national media, the majority of students still say it was worth going into debt to get their degree. This is in spite of the fact that US graduates are carrying a staggering $1.5 trillion of debt, and over a quarter of graduates surveyed in 2016 (who still had student loans to pay off) were looking at a very significant $43,000 or more in student loan related debt.

However, according to a 2019 national poll, the majority of graduates (around 61%) said that they thought that their degree was worth the debt they’d incurred. And this was higher among those who had actually graduated with a four year degree. As this Forbes article pointed out, the majority of those who said the debt incurred wasn’t worth it, were those who didn’t end up graduating. What is perhaps most surprising is that even this group was fairly evenly split. Around 47% claimed the debt was worth it, even though they left college without a Bachelor’s degree.

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So that’s the opinion of graduates, but are they kidding themselves?

It is true that a degree increases earning power, but is it enough to justify your debt? According to Smart Asset research from 2018, the average annual salary of a US worker with a Bachelor’s degree was $59,124, with an unemployment rate of 2.8%. With a high-school diploma, it was $35,256, with a 5.4% unemployment rate.

Even an unfinished degree gives your earnings a small boost. Those who had completed some college but had no degree were on an average salary of $38,376. It seems likely that these ex-students really are kidding themselves. The small increase in earnings is unlikely to compensate for their debt burden, depending on how much debt they have and how expensive it is.

But for those with a full degree and an extra $15,000 a year to pay off loans? It’s not surprising they feel the debt is justified.

Quote - Is a college degree worth the long term debt?

Does it depend on the degree?

Almost certainly, yes. All education is not equal. A degree in law, medicine, or engineering will undoubtedly pay off, whereas one in liberal arts might not. There are still professions that don’t require a degree and, controversially, some claim that a degree can even hinder you, precisely because of the debt incurred.

Elizabeth Gilbert stresses this point in her book, Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear. She advises young writers to avoid the traditional MFA path, saying it can actually hurt your career as a writer. Not because it will have a negative impact on your writing, but because the debt it generates forces young writers into career choices that prioritize money over artistic integrity and creativity. As Gilbert puts it:

“Nobody needs debt less than an artist.”

 Is college about more than financial ROI?

Again, almost certainly yes. College is about spreading your wings, gaining your independence, trying out new activities and experiences that may have nothing to do with your formal education, but everything to do with your personal growth.

It’s also, significantly, about the people you meet. An often overlooked aspect of college life is that you potentially graduate with hundreds of contacts who will be in your industry, or related ones, throughout your working life. This goes for both ‘soft’ and ‘hard’ subjects. Knowing the right people to collaborate with on your next engineering project, fashion collection or TV production can be invaluable. Teachers find out about new positions when members of their network mention someone at their school is quitting. Executives in industries such as advertising and design are likely to draw on their own contacts when employing new team members, and when looking for freelancers.

So should I take on debt to get a college degree or not?

Frustratingly, the answer is still maybe. Here are the things you need to consider:

  • Is a degree important in my chosen career?
  • How much debt will I have take on?
  • How much extra will I earn with this degree?
  • Will that ‘extra’ more than cover loan repayments?
  • Will I definitely complete this degree?
  • Is college going to benefit me in other ways?

There are millionaires with college degrees, and millionaires who dropped out of high school. For the average American, college is (often) worth the price tag. But not for every profession and not for every individual. As with any debt, your student loans are something you should take on with a plan as to how you’ll pay them off, so crunch the numbers first. Know how much debt you’re taking on, what your interest rates will be, how long you’ll take to pay off loans, and perhaps most importantly, what your projected earnings will be with your chosen degree.

Searching for student loan refinancing options doesn’t have to be time-consuming. Click here to receive prequalification rates from Credible within minutes of filling out one simple form.

Disclaimer: The information in this article is not intended to encourage any lifestyle changes without careful consideration and consultation with a qualified professional. This article is for reference purposes only, is generic in nature, is not intended as individual advice and is not financial or legal advice.

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About the Author

Karen Banes
Karen Banes
Freelance writer & indie author sharing thoughts on creativity, productivity, mindset and success.

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CommunityManager
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Hey Karen Banes, thanks for taking on this very polarizing topic. I appreciate the insight from both perspectives. For reference, I am a graduate of a “proper 4-year University” not an online college, and yet I am one of the growing population who questions whether it will make sense to send MY kids to a 4-year college. At this point, I think that unless you have a child who, at 18 years of age, knows EXACTLY what they want to do, and there is a clear precedent in that profession that an advanced degree is required (electrical engineering, for example),… Read more »

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Subscriber bonus: They say it’s a small world. 🌎 Let’s see about that! Did you attend Bismarck State College or know someone who did? If you did, post a comment linking your LinkedIn profile as proof, and Wealthtender will send you a $100 Amazon gift card. If you didn’t but know someone who did, talk them into joining the Wealthtender community and posting a comment with their LinkedIn profile mentioning you referred them, and we’ll send each of you a $100 Amazon gift card. NOTE: Only the first Bismarck State College graduate to post (and their friend) is eligible for… Read more »

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Subscriber bonus #2: Mark Twain may have avoided student loans by not going to college, but he was awarded three honorary degrees from two schools between the years 1888 and 1907. The first two subscribers who correctly post the name of one of the two colleges in the comments section will receive a special gift from Wealthtender. 🎁

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Congratulations to our winners for bonus # 2, Stefani and Erin! Thank you for waking up with Wealthtender!

Erin
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Yale and Oxford!

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Congratulations, Erin! Look for an email later today with information about your subscriber bonus from Wealthtender! Thanks for being an active member of the Wealthtender community! smile

Stefani
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Honorary Degrees: Oxford University and Yale University!

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Congratulations, Stefani! Look for an email later today with information about your subscriber bonus from Wealthtender! Thanks for being an active member of the Wealthtender community! grin

clyde
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Yale University and Oxford University

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